Erythroxylum coca
Regional Anesthesia and Vascular Surgery. (In development)
V14
A
A
https://www.regional-anesthesia.com            Editor: Dr. Robert Maurice Raw   
ADVERTISEMENTS
INTRODUCTION: There of a number of core anesthesia challenges in vascular patients that need extra consideration when considering the use of regional anesthesia as either postoperative pain relief, or as sole anesthetic, or combined with general anesthesia: 1. Most patients have numerous significant systemic co-morbid disease together with their vascular disease. This may make it desirable to fully avoid general anesthesia, or at least avoid deep general anesthetisia by using combined regional and general anesthesia. 2. Vascular repair, especially of smaller and peripheral blood vessels may have protection from early clotting by use of regional anesthesia, making use of regional anesthesia attractive. 3. At some point either before, or during or after surgery anti-coagulant therapy will need to be administered for surgical reasons to prevent clotting in the repaired vessels.  Furthermore many of this group of surgical patients will be on long term anticoagulation therapy that may need brief cessation during surgery. Any nerve block performed in the presence of anticoagualant therapy, where anticoagulant therapy is administered in the presence of a local-aneshtiec drug infusion catheter, e.g. epidural catheter, may make the nerve block be relatively contra-indicated.  All clinical therapy decisions will complex choices balancing bi-directional risk considerations.  Regional-Anesthesia.Com will offer information and discussions to assist practitioners make best clinical decisions. OG27. Ilio-femoral artery bypass graft performed under continuous spinal block. CASE REPORT. Epidural performed under full warfarin anticoagulation. CLICK ASRA Advisory. ESRA Advisory.
Erythroxylum coca
B
Regional Anesthesia and Vascular Surgery. (In development)
https://www.regional-anesthesia.com            Editor: Dr. Robert Maurice Raw   
V14
B
ADVERTISEMENTS
Erythroxylum coca
Regional Anesthesia and Vascular Surgery. (In development)
https://www.regional-anesthesia.com            Editor: Dr. Robert Maurice Raw   
C
V14
ADVERTISEMENTS
C
INTRODUCTION: There of a number of core anesthesia challenges in vascular patients that need extra consideration when considering the use of regional anesthesia as either postoperative pain relief, or as sole anesthetic, or combined with general anesthesia: 1. Most patients have numerous significant systemic co- morbid disease together with their vascular disease. This may make it desirable to fully avoid general anesthesia, or at least avoid deep general anesthetisia by using combined regional and general anesthesia. 2. Vascular repair, especially of smaller and peripheral blood vessels may have protection from early clotting  by use of regional anesthesia, making use of regional anesthesia attractive. 3. At some point either before, or during or after surgery anti-coagulant therapy will need to be administered for surgical reasons to prevent clotting in the repaired vessels.  Furthermore many of this group of surgical patients will be on long term anticoagulation therapy that may need brief cessation during surgery. Any nerve block performed in the presence of anticoagualant therapy, where anticoagulant therapy is administered in the presence of a local- aneshtiec drug infusion catheter, e.g. epidural catheter, may make the nerve block be relatively contra-indicated.  All clinical therapy decisions will complex choices balancing bi-directional risk considerations.  Regional-Anesthesia.Com will offer information and discussions to assist practitioners make best clinical